Juvenile Probation 101

Juvenile Probation FAQ

Please refer to our Locations page for more information

The youth will be transported to a Juvenile Detention and Assessment Center (JDAC), where they will complete the intake process with an Intake Probation Officer.</p>
If a youth is booked into the JDAC, they will:

  • Receive a medical assessment from a nurse.
  • Be allowed two phone calls: one to their parent or guardian, and one to their attorney.
    • Additional calls will be allowed if the youth is a parent.
  • Complete the intake process with an Intake Probation Officer.
  • The intake Probation Officer will notify the youth’s parents or guardian to inform them of the date, time and location of the detention hearing.

Central Valley JDAC (CVJDAC))
900 East Gilbert Street
San Bernardino, CA 92415
(909) 383-1769

High Desert JDAC (HDJDAC)
21101 Dale Evans Parkway
Apple Valley, CA 92307
(760) 961-6701

Juvenile records are confidential and require a release of information.

When a youth has violated a criminal law, and the allegations are found true, and formal probation is granted, the Juvenile Court takes primary responsibility for the control and treatment of the youth.

You must check in with the San Bernardino County Probation Department, Juvenile Services office in your area. All youth with a new grant of probation must complete an orientation and assessment. The assigned probation officer may conduct home or school visits with the youth and schedule meetings with parents to determine how the youth is doing.

Please bring the juvenile packet that was provided to you in court. Also, please bring the child’s birth certificate and social security card.

There are many factors that determine the length of probation, including the seriousness of the offense, the youth’s compliance and progress while on probation supervision and the available custody time for their offense.

Notify your local law enforcement agency and the assigned probation officer immediately.

The consequences of violating the terms and conditions of probation depend on the seriousness of the violation. Violations may be handled informally with a verbal warning, the probation officer may request the youth have additional terms and conditions of probation be imposed or the youth may appear before the court.

As a parent or legal guardian of the youth, you are responsible for paying restitution, fines and fees that are imposed by the Court.

The Juvenile Justice System may maintain jurisdiction over a case until the youth turns 21.

If you were adjudicated and the crime was found true as a juvenile, you were not convicted of a felony.

Please refer to the following document:

Juvenile Probation Citations

 

Assembly Bill 12 (AB12), the Fostering Connections to Success Act became effective January 1, 2012. This bill was designed to provide extended foster care benefits to youth ages 18-21, who are aging out of the foster care system. Youth who had a placement order at the age of 18 and who have successfully met their rehabilitative goals can have their Delinquency Jurisdiction modified to Transition Jurisdiction, pursuant to W&I 450. This modification allows youth to access extended foster care benefits including case management and support services from probation without having the stigma of continuing juvenile probation as an adult. Once a youth is discharged from probation he or she must agree to voluntarily remain under the Juvenile Court’s Transition Jurisdiction and must agree to meet one of five participation conditions, signs a Mutual Agreement for extended foster care, remain under the jurisdiction of the court and remain in a supervised placement. There are many benefits of extended foster some of which include housing, financial, employment and education assistance which are provided in order to encourage a successful transition to adulthood and independent living.

The goals of the AB12 program is to assist youth too transition toward independent living successfully. Although support services are consistently offered, youth are expected to increase their self-sufficiency but are encouraged to build permanent connections with caring and committed adults who can assist them in supportive roles. Program participants are in transition to adulthood and reach their transitional independent living goals in diverse ways. The majority of the youth are placed with Transitional Housing Plus Foster Care providers, in apartment settings. Other living arrangements can be room rentals, dorms, or shared apartments.

For AB 12 information, contact the AB 12 coordinator:
POII Jeff Walnofer
(909) 383-2970 Desk
(760) 646-3836 Cell

SPO Kyle Borg
(909)383-2722 Desk
(909) 806-5424 Cell

The youth will be transported to the Juvenile Detention and Assessment Center (JDAC), where they will complete the intake process with an Intake Probation Officer.

If a youth is booked into the JDAC, they will:

  • Receive a medical assessment from a nurse.
  • Be allowed two phone calls: one to their parent or guardian, and one to their attorney.
    • Additional calls will be allowed if the youth is a parent.
  • Complete the intake process with an Intake Probation Officer.
  • The intake Probation Officer will notify the youth’s parents or guardian to inform them of the date, time and location of the detention hearing.

DETENTION HEARING
The first court appearance for a youth who has been arrested and detained. The purpose of this hearing is for the court to decide whether or not the youth is to remain in custody. This hearing must occur prior to the expiration of the next judicial day after the filing of a Juvenile Court Petition. The outcome is ultimately the decision of the judge. The youth could be detained, released forthwith or released on the House Arrest Program (HAP) with electronic monitoring. Also occurring at this hearing is the appointment of defense counsel and the entering of admission or denial to the allegations.

JURISDICTIONAL HEARING
Also known as a prehearing. The first court appearance for a youth who is not detained. The court makes a determination that a youth comes under its jurisdiction based on age, legal residence and the alleged offense. Defense counsel is appointed and an admission or denial to the allegation(s) occurs. The court may order a Dispositional Report from the probation department and may make certain restrictions which will be noted on the Court Action Slip/Minute Order, such as no contact with victim, co-participants, etc. There may be additional court dates for your child to attend. These dates allow the court to be notified as to the status of the youth and their performance on probation.

PRE-TRIAL HEARING
A hearing which is scheduled for the district attorney and defense counsel to attempt to negotiate a plea.
Contested Jurisdictional Hearing: A trial; also known as a Juris. Youth are not entitled to jury trials, therefore, a judge or commissioner will hear all trials in juvenile court. The standard of proof is beyond a reasonable doubt.

DISPOSITIONAL HEARING
Essentially the same as sentencing in adult court. Prior to disposition, the probation officer conducts an investigation and then submits a report to the court. The report includes circumstances of the offense, restitution, the youth’s statement, school information, statements of parents and other interested parties, and the probation officer’s evaluation or assessment of the youth. The report concludes with a recommendation to the court for a proposed disposition.

REVIEW HEARING
A future hearing to review the progress of the youth under probation supervision. This may be a Non-Appearance Review (NAR) where the youth does not have to be present during the hearing, or an Appearance Review (AR) where the youth is required to be present during the hearing.

DETENTION HEARING
The first court appearance for a youth who has been arrested and detained at a Juvenile Detention and Assessment Center. The purpose of the hearing is for the court to decide whether or not the youth is to remain in custody.

DETENTION REHEARING
When a youth appears before the court following his/her detention for a new crime or probation violation.
Jurisdictional Hearing: Also known as a prehearing. The first court appearance for a youth who is not detained. The juvenile court makes a determination that a youth comes under its jurisdiction based on age, legal residence and the alleged offense.

PRE-TRIAL HEARING
A hearing which is scheduled for the District Attorney (DA) and defense counsel to attempt to negotiate a plea.
Dispositional Hearing: Prior to disposition, the probation officer conducts an investigation and then submits a dispositional report to the court. The report includes circumstances of the offense, the youth’s statement, school information, family information and and a recommendation to the Court. The Dispositional Hearing is the proceeding used to consider the dispositional report, recommendation and to impose court sanctions.

REVIEW HEARING
A hearing to review a youth’s progress or status under probation supervision.
W&I 707 or Fitness Hearing: A hearing where suitability for juvenile court is determined. Under certain circumstances, when charged with a serious or violent crime, a youth 14 years of age or older can be found unfit for juvenile court and may be tried in adult court.

HARVEY WAIVER
When allegations are dismissed but subject to discussion in the dispositional report.

DISMISSED WITH PREJUDICE
Charges contained in a Juvenile Court petition that are dismissed and but cannot be re-filed.

WARD OF THE COURT
Any person who is under the age of 18 when he or she violated a criminal law, and receives a grant of formal probation.

WILLIE T. WAIVER
In a Willie T. Waiver, the Court orders a youth into placement and then stays that order, allowing the youth the opportunity to remain in the community with terms and conditions of probation for a period of 60-90 days. The youth waives the right to contest the placement order if the stay is lifted and the placement order is imposed.

ADJUDICATED
In Juvenile Court, youth are not convicted of a crime, they are adjudicated.

MAXIMUM CONFINEMENT
The maximum term of physical confinement set by the court for the offense or offenses the youth is charged with.

PLACEMENT
When a ward of the court is removed from the home and ordered to reside in a rehabilitative program.